Summer reading: Old books and even older letters

I’ve been neglecting this blog shamefully this summer. I blame it on my bookshelves. They are crammed full of books that I haven’t read yet. Many of them from the bittersweet days of snapping up the steeply discounted remnants of the Borders inventory last September. Far more though, are the result of couch-potato shopping fueled by an Amazon Prime account. And then there are the ones that date all the way back to that happy Christmas over a decade ago when my brother gave me a gift card to Half-Price Books. Truly the gift that keeps on giving.

Fifteen years ago I could point to the wide range of books in my house and stun visitors by asserting that I had actually read them all. No longer. I wish I could blame this on the sheer number of medical textbooks that have infiltrated the house under the auspices of my husband, but the sad fact is that my own wanton book-buying habits are to blame.

I have no desire to be one of those people who have an impressive-looking library full of books whose pages have never been cut. Which is why I’ve stopped buying books. For the most part. For now, at least. With the exception of any books that my personal friends write.

Instead, I’ll be shopping my own bookshelves and trying to catch up a bit on the implicit work there. Although my focus will be on reading as many books as possible as quickly as possible so that I can resume the happy pastime of buying them, I’ll still review books on this blog periodically. The really good ones. Once the summer’s over, and winter forces me to huddle with my computer for warmth. In the meantime, you’ll have to make do with the odd quote from the middle of some books and very short reviews of others.

And of course, links to things that have caught my eye in the odd moments I’ve spent reading online this week. Like:

So, what are you doing with your summer?

Advertisements

About Shala Howell

I spent two decades helping companies like Bell Labs, Juniper Networks, and a genetic testing company that was later acquired by CVS translate some of the world’s most complicated concepts into actionable, understandable English. Now I'm working on a much harder problem -- fostering children’s curiosity and engagement in the scientific, artistic, and linguistic world that surrounds them. The first book in my Caterpickles Parenting Series, What’s That, Mom?, focuses on how to use public art to nurture children’s curiosity in the world around them. My next book, Did Dinosaurs Have Belly Buttons?, is currently planned for release in 2018. In the meantime, you can find me blogging about life with a very curious Ten-Year-Old at Caterpickles.com, chatting about books and the writing life at BostonWriters.blog, and tweeting about books, writing, science, & things that make me smile at @shalahowell.
This entry was posted in Miscellaneous Musings. Bookmark the permalink.

What are you thinking?

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s